Vintage Recipes: Hot Chocolate Drinks from Hershey’s

I have a 1979 edition Hershey’s Cocoa Cookbook and it is chock-full of chocolately deliciousness!

With winter officially here, I thought it would be nice to share a few of the hot drink recipes. Cold weather makes me think of hot chocolate as well as football games and falling leaves. It’s nice to have several easy, delicious recipes to heat up a chilly evening.

Favorite Hot Cocoa

¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon cocoa

½ cup sugar

Dash of salt

1/3 cup hot water

1 quart milk

¾ teaspoon vanilla

Combine cocoa, sugar and salt in a medium saucepan and blend in water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Boil and stir for 2 minutes. Add milk, stir and heat to serving temperature but do not boil. Remove from heat then add vanilla. Beat with a mixer until foamy. Makes about 5 servings.

For a single serving, combine 1 tablespoon cocoa, 2 tablespoons sugar, a dash of salt and 1 tablespoon of water. Boil and stir for 1 minute. Add 1 cup milk and 1/8 teaspoon vanilla. Heat to serving temperature, stirring occasionally.

Spiced Hot Cocoa

¼ cup cocoa

1/3 cup sugar

½ teaspoon cinnamon

¼ teaspoon nutmeg

1/8 teaspoon salt

½ cup hot water

3 ½ cups milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

Dash of ground cloves

Combine cocoa, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a saucepan then blend in hot water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Boil and stir for 2 minutes. Add milk and heat to serving temperature, stirring occasionally. Do not boil. Remove from heat then add vanilla and cloves. Beat with mixer until foamy. Serve hot. Garnish with cinnamon sticks, if desired. Makes 5 servings.

Hurry-Up Hot Cocoa

1 tablespoon cocoa

2 tablespoons sugar

Dash salt

Hot milk

1/8 teaspoon vanilla (optional)

Combine cocoa, sugar and salt in a cup. Stir in hot milk to fill cup. Add vanilla and stir until blended.

Variations

Canadian Cocoa: Add 1/8 teaspoon maple extract.

Irish Mint: add 1/8 teaspoon pure mint and peppermint extract.

Orange Cocoa Cappuccino: Add 1/8 teaspoon pure orange extract.

Swiss Mocha: Add ½ teaspoon instant coffee granules.

Viennese Cocoa: Add a dash of ground cinnamon and a dash of ground nutmeg.

FamilyHolidayFavorites10-15For more delicious wintery treats, check out Family Holiday Favorites, only $2.99 on Amazon, here http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005WDHL20.

It features 50 tried-and-true show stopping recipes split into sweet and savory dishes with a splash of holiday illustrations to keep spirits high.

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Vintage Recipes: Peanut Butter Sandwich Fillings

I have a fun little cookbook called “It’s Easy to be a Gourmet with Peanuts and Other Fine Oklahoma Peanut Products.” I can’t tell how old it is, but it looks to date from the 1950s or possibly 1960s. It was compiled and distributed by the Oklahoma Peanut Commission.

This booklet contains many outlandish dishes developed to include peanuts or peanut butter. Some of these recipes I wouldn’t make on a dare, but some sound interesting. The book includes a fun list of peanut butter sandwich fillings that I thought I’d share.

This seems like a great way to keep kids interested in peanut butter sandwiches, or to reimagine a childhood favorite with some new flavors for adult sandwiches. Some of these mixes sound more appetizing than others, but there are definitely some combinations I would never have thought of.

Date: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup chopped pitted dates, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, ½ cup thick salad dressing. Mix lightly.

Pineapple: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup drained crushed pineapple. Mix lightly.

Prune: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup chopped cooked prunes, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 2 teaspoons prune juice. Blend well.

Apricot: ½ cup peanut butter, 1/3 cup chopped cooked apricots (sweetened), 2 tablespoons thick salad dressing. Mix lightly.

Cranberry Sauce: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup cranberry sauce. Mix lightly.

Raisin: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup chopped raisins, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 1/3 cup milk or cream. Mix lightly.

Pickle Relish: ½ cup peanut butter, 1/3 cup pickle relish, 2 tablespoons thick salad dressing. Blend well.

Carrot and Raisin: ¼ cup peanut butter, ½ cup shredded carrots, 2 tablespoons chopped raisins, 2 tablespoons thick salad dressing. Mix lightly.

Vegetable: ½ cup peanut butter, ½ cup chopped celery stalks with leaves, 1/3 up grated carrots, 2 tablespoons French dressing, 1/8 teaspoon salt. Blend well.

Fig-Nut Sandwich: 1 tablespoon peanut butter, 6 large preserved figs chopped fine. Mix and mash to a paste and spread on thinly sliced bread.

Raisin Honey: 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 ½ tablespoons lemon juice, 1/8 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon mayonnaise, 3 tablespoons honey, ¼ cup chopped peanuts. Combine ingredients, mix thoroughly and use as spread on buttered bread.

Cottage Peanut Butter Spread: 1 cup peanut butter, ½ cup cottage cheese, ½ cup chili sauce, ½ teaspoon salt. Cream peanut butter, cottage cheese and chili sauce together then season with salt.

Add Flair to Halloween Cakes by Starting with Cocoa

Digging around in my stack of ancient cookbooks, I ran across the  Hershey’s Cocoa Cookbook. It includes a couple of great Halloween-named cakes — Devil’s Food and Black Magic cake. But before we get into the recipes, I thought it would be nice to share the substitution guidelines Hershey included in this 1979 cookbook.

For baking chocolate: 3 tablespoons cocoa plus 1 tablespoon shortening or oil equals 1 square (1 ounce) baking chocolate.

For pre-melted unsweetened chocolate: 3 tablespoons cocoa plus 1 tablespoon oil or melted shortening equals 1 envelope (1 ounce) pre-melted unsweetened chocolate.

For semi-sweet chocolate: 6 tablespoons cocoa plus 7 tablespoons sugar plus 1/4 cup shortening equals one 6-ounce package (1 cup) semi-sweet chocolate chips or 6 squares semi-sweet chocolate.

For sweet cooking chocolate: 4 tablespoons cocoa plus 4 2/3 tablespoons sugar plus 2 2/3 tablespoons shortening equals one 4-ounce bar of sweet cooking chocolate.

Why all the fuss about cocoa? It is convenient because you can store it almost indefinitely in the pantry, even after the can has been opened. Also, you can spoon it directly into the mix of your recipe without pre-melting, which saves time and clean-up. Cocoa is also less expensive for cooking, so it’s a money saver.

Devil’s Food Cake

3/4 cup butter or margarine, softened

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

2 eggs

1 3/4 cups unsifted all-purpose flour

1/2 cup cocoa

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup buttermilk or sour milk

1/2 cup boiling water

Cream butter, sugar and vanilla in a large mixing bowl. Add eggs and beat well. Combine four, cocoa, baking soda and salt. Add alternately with buttermilk to create a creamed mixture. Add boiling water and beat until smooth. Pour batter into wax paper-lined 13x9x2-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes or until done. Cool 10 minutes. Remove from pan and remove waxed paper. Cool completely before frosting.

(To make sour milk, use 1 1/2 teaspoons vinegar plus milk to equal 1/2 cup. This is a fine substitute for buttermilk in most recipes.)

Hersheys recommends frosting your Devil’s Foood with Fluffy Vanilla frosting.

Fluffy Vanilla Frosting

1/2 cup butter or shortening

5 cups powdered sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla

1/2 teaspoon salt

4 to 5 tablespoons milk

Cream butter, 1 cup powdered sugar, vanilla and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add remaining powdered sugar alternately with milk, beating to a spreading consistency. Makes 3 cups of frosting.

Black Magic Cake

1 3/4 cups unsifted all-purpose flour

2 cups sugar

3/4 cup cocoa

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

2 eggs

1 cup strong coffee

1 cup buttermilk or sour milk

1/2 cup vegetable oil

1 teaspoon vanilla

Combine dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl then add remaining ingredients. Beat at medium speed for 2 minutes. Batter will be thin. Pour into a greased and floured 13x9x2-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 40 minutes until cake tester comes out clean. Cool completely, then frost.

 

Rainbow Stew is Versatile and Delicious

I had a delicious dinner at a friend’s house recently, so of course I scammed the recipe from her. We had what she called Rainbow Stew. It’s actually her grandmother’s vegetable soup recipe and it’s very versatile. It also can be cooked on the stovetop or in a slow cooker.

Here’s the basic recipe:

Rainbow Stew

5 potatoes, chunked up

3 onions, chopped

1 can corn

1 can peas

1 can tomatoes

1 can tomato sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

1 spoon Crisco

1/2 can water for each can of vegetables

Combine all in slow cooker and cook all day on low or 4 to 6 hours on high.

Before serving, boil a small package of elbow macaroni separately according to package directions then drain and mix into stew. Allow stew to simmer with macaroni in it for a few minutes before serving.

So easy and simple, right? My friend said she often adds sliced fresh okra or celery when she has it on hand and it’s delicious with these additions.

She also often substitutes a can of diced tomatoes and green chilis for the plain tomatoes. This version is much spicier. The batch we ate, she substituted oregano and basil seasoned diced tomatoes instead of plain tomatoes. It was excellent.

She also noted that her grandmother sometimes adds tomato juice instead of water. This made me wonder whether it would be awesome to add chicken broth in place of the water. I think it would. I also think I would slice up some carrots and add them to the stew for even more color.

See what I mean about versatile? You can add (or delete) vegetables according to your family’s tastes, and even adjust the spices easily. And it’s a delicious meal that cooks itself in the slow cooker while you’re out living your life. Wonderful.

For more hearty, delicious dinner ideas, try Carver’s TomatoesCarver’s Tomatoes includes all of George Washington Carver’s 115 Tomato Recipes updated for today’s cooks. These were originally published in 1918 when Carver ran the Agriculture Department at the Tuskegee Institute under Booker T. Washington. His original pamphlet was a large part of his efforts to increase the popularity of tomatoes.

His recipes remain relevant through their use of common pantry and garden ingredients. Known for his personal frugality, most of these recipes are quite inexpensive to prepare and most are quite flexible, allowing the cook to create dishes to serve any number of people. The recipes are wide-ranging, from basic ketchups to soups and salads to dinner entrees.

Carver’s Tomatoes is available online for only $2.99 at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple, Sony or Smashwords.

July 4th Celebrations Deserve Great Ice Cream

When I think of July 4th and food, the first items that come to mind are corn on the cob, watermelon, and ice cream!! The corn on the cob and watermelon pretty much take care of themselves, but not the ice cream. So many choices, so many flavors!

I think I made a great find at a garage sale when I purchased the Complete Book of Homemade Ice Cream for a quarter! It also includes Milk Sherbet and Sherbet recipes. This book dates from 1973 and boasts 300 recipes!

With the 4th right around the corner, I thought I’d share a few recipes from this book that look the tastiest!

First, a few ice cream making tips from Carol Anderson, the author of the Ice Cream book.

  • If no cooking is required, often the ingredients can be combined right in the freezer can, which means fewer dishes to wash.
  • If ice cream is to be hand-stirred during freezing, or if it is to be removed from one container to another, use a wooden spoon to prevent transfer of heat to the mix.
  • Always allow space in the freezer can for expansion of the ice cream when it freezes. Approximately 1/3 of the can is needed for the swell.
  • Cool the mix to room temperature or slightly lower before freezing. Churn-freezing a warm mix may cause a buttery texture due to the increased freezing period.
  • Rock salt can be saved for later use by pouring the used ice and salt mixture into a burlap sack. The the ice melt to leave the salt.
  • Lightly whipping ingredients such as egg whites or cream before adding them to the mix makes a creamier frozen product.
  • Chill serving dishes for 5 minutes in the freezer if the frozen dessert is not too firm.
  • To decorate ice cream, work on a cookie sheet over a pan of ice.

Okay, ready to make some ice cream? Try these recipes on for size.

World-Famous Philadelphia Vanilla

6 cups light cream

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar

2 vanilla beans (3-inch size), split

1/8 teaspoon salt

In top of a double boiler, combine 3 cups cream, sugar, vanilla beans, and salt. Cook, stirring constantly, for 10 minutes. Remove beanpods, scraping pulp and seeds into the cream. Cool.

Add remaining 3 cups cream to the cooled mixture and mix well. Churn freeze. Makes 1/2 gallon.

Anderson notes that this is a key recipe, so cooks can use their own imagination to add fruits, nuts or flavorings to the vanilla to create many other great ice cream treats.

Banana Marshmallow Ice Cream

Anderson marked this one as a favorite of hers. It is certainly unusual.

1 cup milk

30 marshmallows

3/4 cup granulated sugar

3 cups sliced bananas (about 4 bananas)

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

3 1/2 cups heavy cream

In an electric blender, combine milk, marshmallows, sugar, sliced bananas, and lemon juice. Blend on high speed.

Whip heavy cream and then stir into blended banana mixture. Still-freeze. Makes 1/2 gallon.

Anderson notes that still-freezing is just what it sounds like. You make the ice cream mix, put it in a container, and freeze it in the freezer. No churning required. You can churn ice creams mixes that are made for still-freezing, but don’t still-freeze a mix that was created for churning. The still-freeze mixes have a lot more air whipped into them.

Blueberry Ice Cream

2 pints fresh blueberries

1 cup granulated sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt

2 cups heavy cream, lightly whipped

1 cup evaporated milk

Mash berries and cook with sugar over medium heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes.

Press berries through a sieve. Cool.

Add salt, lightly whipped heavy cream and evaporated milk to the berries.

Churn freeze. Makes 1/2 gallon.

For more great freezable flavors, try Gourmet Ice Pops for Kids and Adults. It’s full of great flavors, from kids’ favorites, to more sophisticated flavors, to naughty but delicious alcohol-infused party pops. Available exclusively through Amazon. On sale for the 4th at 99 cents. Now that’s a great party waiting to happen!

Here’s the link: http://www.amazon.com/Gourmet-Pops-Kids-Adults-ebook/dp/B007SPP0I2/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1341240133&sr=1-1&keywords=gourmet+ice+pops+for+kids+and+adults

Vintage Recipe: Ring-Around-the Tuna

Ring-Around-the-TunaToday’s crazy vintage recipe comes from a little book called Joys of Jell-O. I picked this little beauty up at an estate sale recently. I just love these old cookbooks, and some of them have  great vintage recipes in them. Others, less so.

This book was produced by General Foods Kitchens. When I opened the book, it fell open to this recipe. I have to wonder, is it possible that whoever owned this book before me loved to make this dish? Seems so unlikely.

Ring-Around-the-Tuna

A beautiful jewel-like entree salad for your luncheon or buffet table.

1 package (3 oz.) Jell-O Lime or Lemon Gelatin

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup boiling water

3/4 cup cold water

2 tablespoons vinegar

2 teaspoons grated onion

1/2 cup diced cucumber

1/2 cup diced celery

2 tablespoons chopped pimiento

2 tablespoons sliced stuffed olives

1 can (7 oz.) tuna, drained and flaked.

Dissolve Jell-O Gelatin and sat in boiling water. Add cold water, vinegar, and onion. Chill until very thick. Stir in remaining ingredients. Pour into individual ring molds or a 1-quart ring mold. Chill until firm. Unmold on crisp salad greens. If desired, serve with additional tuna and top salads with mayonnaise.Makes 3 2/3 cups, o about 4 entree servings.

That’s the recipe, unaltered. The picture in the book looks a green and see-through, but I swear that the directions tell you to mix the tuna in the Jell-O. Seems like that would make it filmy. Yech.

In the picture, all I can see in the center of the ring is salad greens. Perhaps they are hiding the tuna?

Regardless, I find it unsettling that whoever compiled this cookbook felt that this was a great recipe worthy of a photograph. Only a few recipes have a photo, and only a few of the photos are color. Ring-Around-the-Tuna scored big with a 1/2 page color photo! Yikes.

Jell-O’s Story

The cookbook includes a little history of Jell-O. While I am poking fun at one particular recipe, I would never poke fun at Jell-O. Jell-O is weird comfort food and therefore deserves more respect than that. Also, when I had my children, all I craved in this world was Lime Jell-O.

According to the General Foods Kitchens, “Jell-O Gelatin fist grandly shimmered its way into American dining rooms in 1897.” That’s 115 years ago! This cookbook is only 50 years old, because it was created to celebrate Jell-O’s 65th birthday.

“The bounty of Jell-O doesn’t end with its lightness, good taste, convenience, and versatility. Jell-O Gelatin is nutritious and low in calories, just 83 calories per half-cup serving. It sits as lightly on your conscience as it does on top of any meal. You can add fresh vegetables or fruit, or even a marshmallow or two, and eat and eat.”

Guilty Pleasure

Jell-O salads are truly one of my favorite things to check out at any buffet or pot-luck function. You never know what’s gonna be in there. Some are delicious, some are repulsive. And some, like this Tuna ring insanity, are just wrong. But they’re never boring.

Here are a couple of quick & easy recipes that sound cool and delicious. Thanks Jell-O!

Orange-Mallow Ring

For year ‘round refreshment, mold fresh or canned oranges in gelatin.

1 package (3 oz.) Jell-O Orange or Orange-Pineapple Gelatin

1 cup boiling water

3/4 cup cold ginger ale or water

1 cup miniature marshmallows

1 cup diced fresh orange sections, drained (or 11 oz. can mandarin orange sections, drained)
Dissolve Jell-O in boiling water. Add ginger ale. Chill until very thick. Stir in marshmallows and orange sections. Pour into a 1-quart ring mold or individual ring molds. Chill until firm. Unmold. Makes 3 cups, or 6 servings.

Strawberry-Banana Ring: Prepare Orange-Mallow Ring, substituting Strawberry-Banana gelatin for the Oange gelatin and 2 medium bananas, sliced, for the oranges.